Unlocking Crystallographic Information in Your Laboratory for New Materials Development

Direct visualization of a beta-Ti alloy with overlaid 3D crystallographic information reconstructed from diffraction patterns showing reflections of over 500 grains simultaneously.

ZEISS Microscopy has launched the world's first laboratory-based diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) system for non-destructive 3D grain orientation studies – now in the laboratory, and not just at the synchrotron.

Anonymous
about 6 years agoJuly 30, 2015
00:00:00

Karlen Hovnanyan
about 6 years agoJuly 30, 2015
Thank you for infoemations.
Anonymous
almost 6 years agoSeptember 14, 2015

Tomasz
about 6 years agoJuly 30, 2015
Image looks nice, but is it possible to get real quantifiaction of the orientation or just colored 3D structure?
What was the acqusition time of that data stack? 
What is the main advantage of this technique to comparison with 3D EBSD?
Arno Merkle
about 6 years agoJuly 31, 2015
Hello Tomasz, this is Arno from Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy - thanks for your questions. The output is quantitative and provides grain orientation values within approximately +/- 0.1 degree. The main advantage and key complement to 3D EBSD is to obtain similar information non-destructively on larger volumes, which enables '4D' or microstructure evolution experiments in response to some materials processing or a damage event, for example.

For further questions, please enter them here, and we can be sure to follow-up with you: http://pages.microscopy.zeiss.com/DCT-Contact-Us.html
R. Edelmann
about 6 years agoJuly 30, 2015
Yes, pretty color animation.  Tomasz is right:  how long?  What are the limitations?  And how about some real data?
Arno Merkle
about 6 years agoJuly 31, 2015
Dear R. Edelmann, acquisition times are typically a few hours, up to perhaps 8 or 10 hours for more challenging specimens. 

For more detailed discussion about the technique, I would encourage you to download a Technical Note we have published, available here: http://pages.microscopy.zeiss.com/Diffraction-Contrast-Tomography.html
Kevin ABBASI
about 6 years agoJuly 30, 2015
Pretty, But looks strange. Do we assume that there is no orientation deviation from the grain mean orientation within the grain?
If that's the case we can not analyze deformed structures.
Then the next question is the sample size. What's the max diameter?
And resolution wise, what's the smallest [meaningful] voxel size you can achieve?
Arby
about 6 years agoJuly 30, 2015
Questions above are valid. What is the penetration depth and resolution at that depth? I would assume it relies on the phase density, which couold mean grains beneath are compromised. Is there a set kV used for the imaging or can it be varied to deal with excitation volume on smaller grains of interest? How does this compare to the EBSD technique?
Anonymous
over 2 years agoNovember 4, 2018
Xc /c, x. F,
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